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The Sogdians: Influencers on the Silk Roads

https://asia.si.edu/the-sogdians-influencers-on-the-silk-roads/
<p>Who were the Sogdians? While mostly lost to history, these ancient people of the Silk Roads shaped the world around themnot with an empire or an army but through trade. One of the first references to the Sogdians dates to the fifth century BCE. They were known for their importance on the trade routes that &#8230;</p>
assortment of food dishes

Lunar New Year: Then and Now

https://asia.si.edu/lunar-new-year-then-now/
<p>For as long as I can remember, Lunar New Year has been the highlight of my year. Growing up in Taipei, Taiwan, I would receive red envelopes filled with money from my parents, grandparents, older relatives, and sometimes family friends. My grandmother was known for throwing very festive New Year gatherings with a spread of &#8230;</p>

Lunar New Year: Your Birthday Too

https://asia.si.edu/lunar-new-year-your-birthday-too/
<p>Were celebrating Lunar New Year by sharing personal insights on how different countries mark the holiday. Post your own traditions in the comments. On Lunar New Years Day in Korea, we eat tteokguk, a traditional rice cake soup. There is a belief that eating this soup will make you one year older. My uncle used &#8230;</p>

Lunar New Year: Celebrating Seollal

https://asia.si.edu/lunar-new-year-celebrating-seollal/
<p>Were celebrating Lunar New Year by sharing personal insights on how different countries mark the holiday. Post your own traditions in the comments. In Korea, where Im from, Lunar New Year is called Seollal. The official holiday spans three days, including the day before and after Seollal. Families traditionally come together at the oldest male &#8230;</p>

The Epic that Inspired Diwali

https://asia.si.edu/the-epic-that-inspired-diwali/
<p>Explore the epic story that has inspired one of the biggest Hindu celebrations in the world. What is Diwali? Diwali, the Hindu festival of light, is celebrated all over the world in many different ways. In India, it is common to celebrate by lighting hundreds of small lamps. Indonesian celebrations often include a shadow-puppet play &#8230;</p>

Pocket-Sized Protectors

https://asia.si.edu/pocket-sized-protectors/
<p>In ancient Egypt, amulets were seen as magical objects imbued with powers. They could ward off evil, protect people from animal attacks and other dangers, or prevent physical issues, such as illness and infertility. As portable objects that could be attached to clothing or used in the home, amulets were a popular way to harness &#8230;</p>

Teen Council Perspectives: Filming Buddhist Documentaries

https://asia.si.edu/teen-council-perspectives-filming-buddhist-documentaries/
<p>What does Buddhist practice look like today in the Washington, DC, area? Two short documentaries made by the Freer|Sackler Teen Council with support from DC Asian Pacific American Film highlight two nearby Buddhist temples to consider this question. Sana Mirza, internship coordinator, and Matthew Lasnoski, youth and family programs manager, interviewed the Teen Council members &#8230;</p>

Ready, Set, Glow!

https://asia.si.edu/ready-set-glow/
<p>Create your own glimmering glass lamp and see it shine. What is it made of? Enameled and gilded glass When was it made? Around 1360 Where was it made? Egypt Learn more! Inspiration More than seven hundred years agolong before lightbulbsthis colorful glass lamp hung alongside hundreds of others from the beams of an Egyptian &#8230;</p>

Google Expeditions AR Brings Smithsonian 3D Models into the Home and Classroom via Augmented Reality

https://asia.si.edu/google-expeditions-ar-brings-smithsonian-3d-models-into-the-home-and-classroom-via-augmented-reality/
<p>Capturing the imagination of students who have seen it all is an age-old challenge; and fitting emerging technologies into the classroom has long been a hit-or-miss proposition. With Expeditions, Google may have found the Golden Mean, and with the help of the Smithsonians rich collections and authoritative scholarship, the app is igniting wonder and curiosity &#8230;</p>

Ancient women speak out – today!

https://asia.si.edu/ancient-women-speak-out-today/
<p>Two women at the Freer|Sackler, though quite ancient, nonetheless today impart to us their sage advice. One is named Haliphat, and she comes to us from Palmyra (in todays Syria), where she died in 231 BCE. The other is nicknamed Miriam; she is probably a century or two older and hails from Timna (in todays &#8230;</p>