Bowl

Small red/brown, earthenware bowl with black painted decoration. The decoration on the inside of the bowl is divided into four irregular zones by two intersecting lines of crosshatched chevrons which meet slightly off center at the bottom of the bowl. There is a double line running parallel to the rim that creates a register along the inner rim. This register, which is divided into four zones by the intersecting, crosshatched chevrons, features rows of animals in each zone: four quadrupeds; five birds; three quadrupeds; three birds. Thus the quadrupeds are opposite the quadrupeds and the birds are opposite the birds. The outside of the bowl features a double line of concentric circles along the rim, followed by an open-bottomed zig-zag border.

Previously broken in about 10 fragments, most of which are large. The repairs are poor and the fills/restorations unsightly. The joins are not tight and the fills are executed badly and are not flush with the surface. Scattered chips are missing. Numerous scratches and wear. Possible wax or coating on the surface.

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Historical period(s)
Chalcolithic period, ca. 5500-3000 BCE
Medium
Earthenware
Dimensions
H x W x D: 7.7 x 22.3 x 22.3 cm (3 1/16 x 8 3/4 x 8 3/4 in)
Geography
Iran, Northern
Credit Line
Gift of Victor and Takako Hauge
Collection
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Accession Number
S1998.309
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Bowl

Keywords
Chalcolithic period (5000 - 3500 BCE), earthenware, Hauge collection, Iran
Provenance

From at least 1965 to 1998
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Hauge [1]

From 1998
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Hauge in 1998

Notes:

[1] Object record.

Previous Owner(s) and Custodian(s)

Victor and Takako Hauge (1919-2013, 1923-2015)

Description

Small red/brown, earthenware bowl with black painted decoration. The decoration on the inside of the bowl is divided into four irregular zones by two intersecting lines of crosshatched chevrons which meet slightly off center at the bottom of the bowl. There is a double line running parallel to the rim that creates a register along the inner rim. This register, which is divided into four zones by the intersecting, crosshatched chevrons, features rows of animals in each zone: four quadrupeds; five birds; three quadrupeds; three birds. Thus the quadrupeds are opposite the quadrupeds and the birds are opposite the birds. The outside of the bowl features a double line of concentric circles along the rim, followed by an open-bottomed zig-zag border.

Previously broken in about 10 fragments, most of which are large. The repairs are poor and the fills/restorations unsightly. The joins are not tight and the fills are executed badly and are not flush with the surface. Scattered chips are missing. Numerous scratches and wear. Possible wax or coating on the surface.

Label

Initially, potters in Iran must have copied shapes of vessels fashioned in materials that boasted still older craft histories: stone, wood, leather, and basketry.  In addition, decorated textiles may have inspired ornamental patterns introduced in colored paint to the surfaces of clay vessels like this one.  

Published References
  • Louise Allison Cort, Massumeh Farhad, Ann C. Gunter. Asian Traditions in Clay: The Hauge Gifts. Washington, 2000. cat. 3, pp. 19, 53.
Collection Area(s)
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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