Beak spouted vessel

A rounded libation vessel with a long beak spout and two pointed feet extending from the base under the spout. Hand built of red/brown, burnished earthenware, this vessel has a flat base. Opposite the spout is an applied decoration consisting of three sets of ridges which extend down the body and branch out, giving the appearance of tuning forks, or tails. The opening of the spout is deep and trough-like, and the neck which connects the spout to the body of the vessel has three raised, very fine bands. The first is at the top of the neck, just below the spout; the second, in the middle of the neck, where it curves at a right angle; and the third, where the neck meets the body of the vessel. The spout also has several raised, rivet-shaped bumps. This ornamentation seems to be an imitation of metalwork.

Heavily restored and altered. The breaks are numerous, but approximately 1/2 of the surface has been covered over with a thick restoration/overpaint, and it is impossible to assess the extent of the damage and loss. “Applied dirt” also covers over the repairs and it is unclear whether the “feet” actually belong. The restoration’s surface’s deteriorating, evidenced by crackling and flaking of the paint.

Historical period(s)
1900-800 BCE
Medium
Burnished earthenware
Dimensions
H x W x D: 19.1 x 41.1 x 15.8 cm (7 1/2 x 16 3/16 x 6 1/4 in)
Geography
Iran
Credit Line
Gift of Osborne and Gratia Hauge
Collection
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Accession Number
S1998.172
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Vessel

Keywords
earthenware, Hauge collection, Iran, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

From circa 1950-1970 to 1998
Mr. and Mrs. Osborne and Gratia Hauge [1]

From 1998
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Osborne and Gratia Hauge in 1998

Notes:

[1] Object record. Purchased by the Hauges in Tehran between 1950-1970.

Previous Owner(s) and Custodian(s)

Mr. and Mrs. Osborne and Gratia Hauge (1914-2004) and (died 2000)

Description

A rounded libation vessel with a long beak spout and two pointed feet extending from the base under the spout. Hand built of red/brown, burnished earthenware, this vessel has a flat base. Opposite the spout is an applied decoration consisting of three sets of ridges which extend down the body and branch out, giving the appearance of tuning forks, or tails. The opening of the spout is deep and trough-like, and the neck which connects the spout to the body of the vessel has three raised, very fine bands. The first is at the top of the neck, just below the spout; the second, in the middle of the neck, where it curves at a right angle; and the third, where the neck meets the body of the vessel. The spout also has several raised, rivet-shaped bumps. This ornamentation seems to be an imitation of metalwork.

Heavily restored and altered. The breaks are numerous, but approximately 1/2 of the surface has been covered over with a thick restoration/overpaint, and it is impossible to assess the extent of the damage and loss. "Applied dirt" also covers over the repairs and it is unclear whether the "feet" actually belong. The restoration's surface's deteriorating, evidenced by crackling and flaking of the paint.

Collection Area(s)
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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