Mandarin ducks

Maker(s)
Artist: Unkoku Toetsu (active late 17th - early 18th century)
Historical period(s)
Edo period, late 17th-early 18th century
Medium
Ink and color on paper
Dimensions
H x W (image): 111.3 x 43 cm (43 13/16 x 16 15/16 in)
Geography
Japan
Credit Line
Gift of Anne Hollis Reese
Accession Number
F1998.310
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Painting
Type

Hanging scroll

Keywords
duck, Edo period (1615 - 1868), Japan, kakemono, tree, WWII-era provenance
Provenance
Provenance information is currently unavailable
Previous Owner(s)

Mrs. Anne Reese

Label

Mandarin ducks, which remain with one mate for life, are symbols of marital accord. A pair of mandarin ducks swimming on a nearly frozen surface often represents the twelfth month of the lunar year. This skillfully rendered work features the strong delineation and rendering of three-dimensional form that was introduced into Japanese painting from China. The artist was a descendant of the Unkoku school, which traced its artistic lineage to Sesshu (1420-1506), who was one of a few artists able to travel to China to study painting. The Unkoku school flourished in Yamaguchi, where Sesshu lived for a time.

Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum