Folio from a Mihr-u Mushtari (The Sun and Jupiter) by Shams al-Din Muhammad Assar Tabrizi (d. circa 1382); verso: Mihr feasting with Kayvan the King of Khwarazm; recto: text, Mihr playing lute and feasting with Kayvan

Detached folio from a bound copy of Mihr-u Mushtari (The Sun and Jupiter) by Shams al-Din Muhammad Assar Tabrizi; text: Persian in black nasta’liq script; recto: text: Mihr playing lute and feasting with Kayvan, 2 columns, 11 lines; verso: illustration and text: Mihr feasting with Kayvan the King of Khwarazm; one of a group of 6: the manuscript (F1932.3a-b) and 5 detached folios are accessioned separately.
Border: The painting and the text are set in gold and blue rulings on cream-colored paper.

Maker(s)
Calligrapher: Ibrahim Khalil
Author: Shams al-Din Muhammad Assar of Tabriz
Historical period(s)
Shaybanid dynasty, Uzbek period, 1523-24 (930 A.H.)
Medium
Ink, opaque watercolor and gold on paper
Dimensions
H x W: 18.3 x 11.6 cm (7 3/16 x 4 9/16 in)
Geography
Uzbekistan, Bukhara
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1932.7
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Manuscript
Type

Manuscript folio

Keywords
king, Mihr, tambourine, Uzbek period (1500 - 1598), Uzbekistan, wine
Provenance
Provenance information is currently unavailable
Description

Detached folio from a bound copy of Mihr-u Mushtari (The Sun and Jupiter) by Shams al-Din Muhammad Assar Tabrizi; text: Persian in black nasta'liq script; recto: text: Mihr playing lute and feasting with Kayvan, 2 columns, 11 lines; verso: illustration and text: Mihr feasting with Kayvan the King of Khwarazm; one of a group of 6: the manuscript (F1932.3a-b) and 5 detached folios are accessioned separately.
Border: The painting and the text are set in gold and blue rulings on cream-colored paper.

Label

Among the most popular compositions in Persian manuscripts are those of elegantly dressed figures feasting in outdoor settings.  Inspired by the ancient Persian ritual of bazm--a form of celebration with wine and music--these paintings and drawings are used to illustrate a number of different literary concepts and ideas.

One such scene is included in a sixteenth-century copy of Mihr-u Mushtari (Mihr and Mishtari), a poem on love and friendship.  According to the poet Assar (died 1359), when Mihr helped to defeat the enemy of the king of Kharazm in eastern Iran, he was honored with a lavish feast in a lush and fragrant garden.  The painting's lyrical style, typical of late fifteenth-and early sixteenth-century Herat, presents a close visual parallel to the festive nocturnal gathering described by Assar.


Published References
  • Philipp Walter Schulz. Die Persisch-Islamische Miniaturmalerei: Ein Beitrag zur Kunstgeschichte Irans. 2 vols, Leipzig. pl. 79.
  • Franz Rosenthal. Four Essays on Art and Literature in Islam. The L.A. Mayer Memorial Studies in Islamic Art and Archaeology, vol. 2 London. pl. 11.
  • Richard Ettinghausen, Ernst Kuhnel. A Survey of Persian Art from Prehistoric Times to the Present. 6 vols., London and New York, 1938 - 1939. vol. 3: p. 1871.
  • Dr. Esin Atil. Exhibition of 2500 Years of Persian Art. Exh. cat. Washington, 1971. cat. 28, p. 10.
  • Abolala Soudavar, Milo Cleveland Beach. Art of the Persian Court: Selections from the Art and History Trust Collection. New York. cat. 11, p. 257.
  • Glenn D. Lowry, Milo Cleveland Beach, Elisabeth West FitzHugh, Susan Nemanzee, Janet Snyder. An Annotated and Illustrated Checklist of the Vever Collection. Washington and Seattle. p. 338.
Collection Area(s)
Arts of the Islamic World
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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