All Results for "Tsuchida Hiromi"

11 results found for Tsuchida Hiromi

Tsuchida Hiromi

https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/tsuchida-hiromi/

(born Fukui Prefecture, 1939) Tsuchida initially trained as an engineer at Fukui University, then graduated from the Tokyo College of Photography in 1966. He started his career shooting advertisements for a cosmetics company before becoming a freelance photographer. Influenced by the work of Domon Ken and Tomatsu Shomei, he produced several series on postwar Hiroshima …

Black and white photo of a man in white clothing and gloves, holding a stick, wearing shades

Japan Modern | People

https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/people/

Fukase Masahisa (born Hokkaido, 1934–2012) Hamaya Hiroshi (born Tokyo, 1915–1999) Hayashi Tadahiko (born Tokuyama, 1918–1990) Hirogane Yoshiro (born Okayama City, 1894–?) Hosoe Eikoh (born Yonezawa, 1933) Ishikawa Noboru (born Fukuoka, 1881–?) Ishiuchi Miyako (born Nitta District, 1947) Kitai Kazuo (born Liaoning Province, Manchuria, China, 1944) Moriyama Daido (born Ikeda City, Osaka, 1938) Nagano Shigeichi (born …

Black and white photo of people walking on a dune

Japan Modern | Places

https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/places/

I have been wandering these past several years in mountains, villages, towns, and cities . . . I suppose what I was trying to do was to find myself again as a Japanese. —Tsuchida Hiromi In the wake of wartime destruction and rapid reconstruction, Japanese photographers traveled throughout the country and created groundbreaking photographic projects. …

Aomori

https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/aomori/

The modern city, with its increasing density, mass culture, and changing family and community values, led photographers Tsuchida Hiromi and Kitai Kazuo to travel throughout Japan in the late 1960s and 1970s. Tsuchida photographed folklife in Aomori and other less developed areas for his series Zokushin (Gods of the Earth). Published in 1976, his black-and-white …

Mount Fuji

https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/mount-fuji/

Japan’s highest mountain, straddling the border between Shizuoka and Yamanashi Prefectures just west of Tokyo, has been an enduring subject in Japanese art. Ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai famously depicted the mountain from various vantage points and seasons in his series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, produced between 1830 and 1832. Perhaps Japan’s most recognizable natural landmark, …