Gauri Ragini, folio from a Ragamala

Historical period(s)
ca. 1650
Medium
Opaque watercolor on paper
Dimensions
H x W (painting): 21.6 × 19.3 cm (8 1/2 × 7 5/8 in) H x W (overall): 28.9 × 23.5 cm (11 3/8 × 9 1/4 in)
Geography
India, Madhya Pradesh state, Raghogarh
Credit Line
Purchase and partial gift from the Catherine and Ralph Benkaim Collection — funds provided by the Friends of the Freer and Sackler Galleries
Collection
Ralph and Catherine Benkaim collection
Accession Number
S2018.1.41
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Painting
Type

Painting

Keywords
flower, India, ragamala, Ralph and Catherine Benkaim collection, tree, woman
Provenance

To 1969
Nowlakah, Calcutta [1]

From 1969 to 2001
Ralph Benkaim (1914-2001), purchased from Nowlakah, Calcutta in 1969 [2]

From 2001 to 2018
Catherine Glynn Benkaim, Beverly Hills, California, by inheritance from Ralph Benkaim in 2001

From 2018
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, partial gift and purchase from Catherine Glynn Benkaim

Notes:

[1] Ralph Benkaim purchased the painting from Nowlakah, Calcutta in 1969, several years before Indian paintings were classified as antiquities by the Indian government, according to his personal records, as relayed by Catherine Glynn Benkaim.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

Nowlakah Kolkata, India
Catherine Glynn Benkaim
Ralph and Catherine Benkaim

Label

A lady dressed in orange walks amidst a grove of four trees. She holds crossed flowering staffs. Raga (Sanskrit, color or passion) is the term for a classical music mode, a set framework for improvisation. Having originated in the first millennium, ragas were systematized and classified during the thirteenth through sixteenth century, they were classified into ragamalas, meaning garlands of musical modes. A common system recognized six raga husbands, each "married" to five ragini wives for a total of thirty-six "families." Families of musical modes sometimes included sons or ragaputras as well. By the fifteenth century, ragas had become associated with specific moods, times, seasons, affective properties, deities, lovers, and heroes. Around 1590-1620, illustrated ragamala series became a favorite subject for Rajput patrons, as well as for some Mughals, such as Abd-ur Rahim, patron of the Freer Ramayana and the Laud Ragamala. Specific iconographies were developed for depicting each mode. These formulae lent themselves to variations, which were sometimes dependent on region.

Illustrated ragas evoke mood and engender feeling, as do musical compositions. But the connection seems to be indirect. Although some connoisseurs of music may have internally "heard" a composition when viewing its image, ragamalas were probably more broadly valued for their poetic and pictorial pleasures. The commission of a ragamala series would also have been understood as a sign of a patron's cultivated sensibility.

Collection Area(s)
South Asian and Himalayan Art
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum