Taj Mahal No. 1

Maker(s)
Artist: Yoshida Hiroshi 吉田博 (1876-1950)
Historical period(s)
Showa era, 1931
Medium
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Dimensions
H x W: 27.5 x 40.6 cm (10 13/16 x 16 in)
Geography
Japan
Credit Line
Gift of H. Ed Robison in memory of Katherine W. Robison
Collection
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Accession Number
S1996.8
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Print
Type

Woodblock print

Keywords
Japan, Showa era (1926 - 1989), tomb, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

To 1996
Henry Edwin Robison (1913-2008), Palo Alto, CA, to 1996

From 1996
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, given by Henry Edwin Robison in 1996

Previous Owner(s)

Henry Edwin Robison 1913-2008

Label

These prints [along with S1996.9] are the first of six views of the Taj Mahal created by Yoshida after he returned to Japan from his trip to India.  The artist's fascination with the effects of changing light found a perfect subject in the Taj Mahal and its gardens.  Using the same set of carved woodblocks for both prints, Yoshida has effectively rendered the scene in daylight and in darkness.  Subtly varied ones of blue and gray dominate the night scene, where the diffuse moonlight reflects softly from the white marble buildings and a bright lamp within the tomb is reflected in the garden pool.

Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Whistler's Neighborhood
Google Cultural Institute
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