Vessel with long spout

Bulbous vessel with flat base, constricted neck that flares toward an open rim. The elongated spout is attached at right angles to the body, with a swelling at the base. Eight hemispherical rivets encircle the base of the spout where it is attached to the vessel.

Historical period(s)
Iron Age II - III, ca. 1250- 500 BCE
Medium
Bronze
Dimensions
H x W x D: 9.3 x 24.1 x 9.1 cm (3 11/16 x 9 1/2 x 3 9/16 in)
Geography
Iran
Credit Line
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Bunker in memory of Dr. Edith Porada
Collection
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Accession Number
S1996.73
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Metalwork, Vessel
Type

Vessel

Keywords
casting, Iran, Iron Age II (ca. 1250 - 800 BCE), Iron Age III (ca. 800 - 500 BCE), riveting, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

To the late 1950s or 1960s
H. Khan Monif (died 1968), Persian Antique Gallery, New York to the late 1950s or 1960s [1]

From the late 1950s or 1960s to 1996
Emma C. Bunker, purchased in New York City from H. Khan Monif in the late 1950s or 1960s [2]

From 1996
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, given by Mr. John B. and Mrs. Emma C. Bunker, Wheatland, WY, in 1996

Notes:

[1] According to Provenance Remark 1 in the object record.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

Mr. and Mrs. John B. and Emma Bunker
H. Kahn Monif died 1968

Description

Bulbous vessel with flat base, constricted neck that flares toward an open rim. The elongated spout is attached at right angles to the body, with a swelling at the base. Eight hemispherical rivets encircle the base of the spout where it is attached to the vessel.

Label

Judging from similar examples excavated at sites in northern and western Iran (e.g., Tappe Marlik, Tappe Guran, and Tappe Sialk), this type of vessel was in use from about 1100 to 700 BCE. In 2005, a hoard of ca. 350 such metal vessels was found near Khorramabad in Luristan, Iran, indicating a use in collaborative rituals. Metal vessels such as this one inspired also larger ceramic versions, as well as stone vessels with long narrow metal spouts. The decorative rivets that encircle the base of the spout and disguise where it joins the bulbous body may have had a practical purpose.

Published References
  • Ezat O. Negahban. Marlik: The Complete Excavation Repord. 2 vols., Philadelphia. .
  • Louise Allison Cort, Dr. Massumeh Farhad, Ann C. Gunter. Asian Traditions in Clay: The Hauge Gifts. Washington, 2000. p. 47, fig. 4.
  • P.R.S. Moorey. Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum. Oxford. pp. 276-280.
Collection Area(s)
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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