Jamshid u Khurshid by Salman Savaji (d.1357)

Manuscript; Jamshid u Khursid by Salman Savaji; Persian in black nasta’liq script with illuminated headings in white; 115 folios with 1 illuminated medallion (folio1 recto), 1 unwan (folio 1 verso), 5 paintings (6verso, 33recto, 60verso, 83recto and 107verso), and 1 dated colophon (folio 115recto); standard page: 2 columns, 14 lines of text.
Binding: The manuscript is bound in contemporary leather over paper pasteboards with gilt block-stamped designs on exterior covers, and doublures of block-stamped and leather filigree over a green and brown colored paper ground.

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Historical period(s)
Safavid period, Possibly ca. 1600
Medium
Opaque watercolor, ink, and gold on paper
Dimensions
H x W: 24.2 x 15.6 cm (9 1/2 x 6 1/8 in)
Geography
Iran
Credit Line
Purchase — Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program, and Dr. Arthur M. Sackler
Collection
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Accession Number
S1986.53
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Manuscript
Type

Manuscript

Keywords
Henri Vever collection, Iran, Jamshid, Khurshid, Safavid period (1501 - 1722)
Provenance

Possibly to 1907
Possibly Octave Marie Joseph Kérim Homberg Sr. (1844-1907), method of acquisition unknown [1]

Likely 1907-1931
Octave Marie Joseph Kérim Homberg Jr. (1876-1941), possibly by inheritance from his father, Octave Marie Joseph Kérim Homberg Sr. [2]

1931
Sale, Paris, Galerie Georges Petit, "Catalogue des tableaux anciens : objets d'art et de haute curiosité européens et orientaux ... la collection de Octave Homberg," Juin 3, 2, & 5, 1931, lot 89 [3]

Possibly 1931-1935
Emile Tabbagh (ca.1880-1933), likely purchased at the Galerie Georges Petit auction [4]

1935
Sale, Paris, Hôtel Drouot, Collection de Monsieur Emile Tabbagh, May 20-21, 1935, no. 135. [5]

Possibly 1935-1942
Henri Vever (1854-1942), likely purchased at the Hôtel Drouot sale [6]

1942-1947
Jeanne Louise Monthiers (1861-1947), bequest of Henri Vever [7]

1947-1986
Francois Mautin (1907-2003), bequest of Jeanne Louise Monthiers and Henri Vever [8]

From 1986
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery purchased from Francois Mautin [9]

Notes:

[1]Octave Homberg Senior was a Censor of the Bank of France before becoming the Director of the Société Générale, one of the oldest banks in France. He amassed a diverse collection of fine arts, which included medieval European sculpture and Islamic manuscripts and objects. Upon his death, he bequeathed most of his collection to his son, Octave Homberg Jr. The works that were not passed on to Homberg Jr. were sold via auction at Galerie Georges Petit on May 11-16, 1908, in Paris, France.

[2] See note 3. Octave Homberg Jr. was a French diplomat, banker, writer, and collector. As one of France's foremost financiers, he served as the French financial agent in the United States and part of the Anglo-French Commission. In the early 1930s, Homberg fell into financial trouble and in 1931 sold the majority of his art collection, most of which he had inherited from his father. It iss possible that Homberg Senior bequeathed this manuscript to his son, Homberg Jr., see note 1.

[3] Galerie Georges Petit, "Catalogue des tableaux anciens : objets d'art et de haute curiosité européens et orientaux ... la collection de Octave Homberg" [auction catalogue] (Paris, June 3-5, 1931), lot 89. See also of annotations on version of last folio of manuscript.

[4] Emile Tabbagh, with his brother George Tabbagh, operated the art dealership Tabbagh Freres at 8 Rue Rossini and then at 39 rue Lafayette in Paris. The brothers opened a second branch of their successful gallery in New York at 396 5th Avenue. They specialized in the sale of Raqqa ware and Persian objects and manuscripts. Following Emile's death on December 31, 1933, his family sold his personal collection in two separate auctions. The first was held March 20-21, 1935, in Paris and the second auction occurred January 3-4, 1936 in New York. This work was sold during the first auction, see note 5.

[5] Hôtel Drouot, "Collection de Monsieur Emile Tabbagh" [auction catalogue](Paris, May 20-21, 1935), lot 135. See also annotations on verso of last folio in manuscript.

[6] An accomplished French jeweler and collector, Henri Vever amassed a large collection of fine art. His collections of Japanese prints and Islamic manuscripts were widely respected, as Vever acquired pieces of exceptional quality and rarity. Intensely studying the visual aspects of Islamic art, loaning to exhibitions, and publishing on Islamic art, Vever quickly became one of the leading experts on Islamic painting and manuscripts. This work was in Vever's collection at the time of his death in 1942.

[7] Upon Henri Vever's death on September 25, 1942, his wife, Jeanne Louise Monthiers inherited the work. See exhibits F and G of Agreement of Purchase and Sale of the Henri Vever Collection, January 9, 1986, copy in object file.

[8] Upon the death of Jeanne Louise Monthiers, as stipulated in the will of Henri Vever, the family's assets were divided evenly between his two grandchildren. His only grandson, Francois Mautin inherited the collection known as "The Henri Vever Collection of Oriental Art and Manuscripts Including Persian and Indian Art and Manuscripts." This object is part of that collection. See exhibits F and G as cited in note 7.

[9] The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery purchased the entirety of the collection from Francois Mautin on January 9, 1986. See purchase agreement, copy in object file.

Research complete July 11, 2022.

Previous Owner(s) and Custodian(s)

Octave Homberg
Octave Marie Joseph Kérim Homberg Sr. 1844 - 1907
Henri Vever 1854-1942
Jeanne Louise Monthiers 1861 - 1947
Emile Tabbagh 1879-80 - 1933
Francois Mautin 1907 - 2003

Description

Manuscript; Jamshid u Khursid by Salman Savaji; Persian in black nasta'liq script with illuminated headings in white; 115 folios with 1 illuminated medallion (folio1 recto), 1 unwan (folio 1 verso), 5 paintings (6verso, 33recto, 60verso, 83recto and 107verso), and 1 dated colophon (folio 115recto); standard page: 2 columns, 14 lines of text.
Binding: The manuscript is bound in contemporary leather over paper pasteboards with gilt block-stamped designs on exterior covers, and doublures of block-stamped and leather filigree over a green and brown colored paper ground.

Inscription(s)

First Flyleaf, recto, top right, "no. 135 Tabbagh" written in pencil

First Flyleaf, recto, affixed to page, round white sticker "166" written in blue ink

First Flyleaf, recto, bottom of page "no. 54" written in pencil

Last page, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page "89" stenciled in black ink

Last flyleaf, verso, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page "Homberg 1931" written in pencil

Last flyleaf, verso, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page "O1HH" written in pencil

Last flyleaf, verso, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page "no. 135= sbxxx %"

Last flyleaf, verso, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page "48 rfm xx" written in pencil

Last flyleaf, verso, top of page near spine, rectangular paper glued to page, round sticker affixed to rectangular paper "no. 2285" written in black ink

Fol. 1 recto: The soul, through the minds of narrators, perfumes the tales of prophets and apostles, and thanks be that sweet-scented opening chapters[?], through the eyes of storytellers, illluminate the reports of the saints. He is worthy of the court of creativity and form giving who scribes the marvelous form of humanity with the pen of his omnipotence in the most beautiful fashion upon the tablet of existence, for [it is written]: "It is he who shapes you in [the most beautiful form]."

Published References
  • Tabbagh Frères. Publication title unknown. cat. 135, p. 21.
  • Octave Homberg. Publication title unknown. cat. 89, p. 47, pl. XLII.
  • Glenn D. Lowry, Milo Cleveland Beach, Elisabeth West FitzHugh, Susan Nemanzee, Janet Snyder. An Annotated and Illustrated Checklist of the Vever Collection. Washington and Seattle. cat. 283, pp. 249-251.
Collection Area(s)
Arts of the Islamic World
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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