Otafuku

Otafuku, the subject of this painting, is a popular deity associated with the jovial and voluptuous goddess Ame no Uzume no Mikoto, whose erotic dancing caused such commotion that it lured the sun goddess Amaterasu no Omikami to push aside the rock with which she has sealed herself into a cave. The black lacquered wood roller knobs are decorated with maki-e designs of snowflakes in gold and silver. The mounting silks have been carefully selected to complement the painting. The center part of the mounting suggests a bamboo blind, or sudare, while the plum blossoms at the top and bottom refer to the month of February, when the custom of setsubun, or dispelling of evil by throwing beans on the floor is practiced.

Maker(s)
Artist: Ikeda Taishin (1825-1903)
Historical period(s)
Meiji era, 1868-1903
Medium
Ink and light color on paper
Dimensions
H x W (image): 116.9 x 50 cm (46 x 19 11/16 in)
Geography
Japan
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1997.20
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Painting
Type

Hanging scroll

Keywords
Japan, kakemono, Meiji era (1868 - 1912), Okame, WWII-era provenance
Provenance
Provenance research underway.
Description

Otafuku, the subject of this painting, is a popular deity associated with the jovial and voluptuous goddess Ame no Uzume no Mikoto, whose erotic dancing caused such commotion that it lured the sun goddess Amaterasu no Omikami to push aside the rock with which she has sealed herself into a cave. The black lacquered wood roller knobs are decorated with maki-e designs of snowflakes in gold and silver. The mounting silks have been carefully selected to complement the painting. The center part of the mounting suggests a bamboo blind, or sudare, while the plum blossoms at the top and bottom refer to the month of February, when the custom of setsubun, or dispelling of evil by throwing beans on the floor is practiced.

Inscription(s)

1. (Ann Yonemura, 8 July 1997) The painting bears a seal reading Taishin, which identifies the artist as Ikeda Taishin. The right roller knob has the character "Ryu" in gold maki-e on the back, and the left roller knob has the character, "shin." These identify the lacquerer Umezawa Ryushin. The box is inscribed by Shoji Chikushin, a fellow disciple of Shibata Zeshin.

2, (Information obtained from Sellers invoice) The box inscription reads; Ka'kan'an Chikushin kan tomo dai. Seal: yukei (square/relief).

Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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