Mino ware tea-ceremony water jar

Brown clay. String-cut flat base. Two thick, horizontal handles. Sculpted with vertical slashes, horizontal incised lines; underglaze iron painted decoration of pine tree on one side, willow tree on the other. Translucent light brown ash glaze; base glazed except in center. Circular scar from clay firing ring in glaze in bottom; four scars around edge of inward-rolled lip where matching clay lid (now lost) was supported for firing.

Historical period(s)
Momoyama period, 1607-1615
Medium
Stoneware with iron pigment under ash glaze
Style
Mino ware, Mino Karatsu type
Dimensions
H x W x D: 19 x 23.5 x 23.5 cm (7 1/2 x 9 1/4 x 9 1/4 in)
Geography
Japan, Gifu prefecture, Toki city, Kujiri village, Motoyashiki kiln
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1967.17a-b
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Tea ceremony water jar (mizusashi)

Keywords
Japan, Mino ware, Mino Karatsu type, Momoyama period (1573 - 1615), pine tree, stoneware, tea, tree, water, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

To 1967
S. Yabumoto Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan. [1]

From 1967
Freer Gallery of Art, purchased from S. Yabumoto, Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan. [2]

Notes:

[1] Curatorial Remark 1 in the object record.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

S. Yabumoto Co., Ltd.

Description

Brown clay. String-cut flat base. Two thick, horizontal handles. Sculpted with vertical slashes, horizontal incised lines; underglaze iron painted decoration of pine tree on one side, willow tree on the other. Translucent light brown ash glaze; base glazed except in center. Circular scar from clay firing ring in glaze in bottom; four scars around edge of inward-rolled lip where matching clay lid (now lost) was supported for firing.

Label

A phenomenon of the Momoyama period was the imitation of popular wares from other kilns.  The Motoyashiki kiln in Mino, which produced the earliest Oribe wares, also made Karatsu-style wares using underglaze iron glaze decoration and Iga-style wares. Karatsu kilns in turn made some imitations of unglazed Bizen ware.  Such activity was a measure of the enormous commercial success of Momoyama ceramics.

Published References
  • Andrew Maske. Potters and Patrons in Edo Period Japan: Takatori Ware and the Kuroda Domain. Farnham, Surry, UK and Burlington, Vermont. fig. 4.8.
  • Oriental Ceramics: The World's Great Collections. 12 vols., Tokyo. vol. 10, pl. 53.
  • Louise Allison Cort. Seto and Mino Ceramics. Washington and Honolulu, 1992. cat. 40, p. 31.
  • Edwards Park. Treasures from the Smithsonian Institution., 1st ed. Washington and New York. p. 357.
Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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