Bowl

Clay: sandy, white.
Glaze: opaque, cream-colored, crazed; lustreless blue glaze on the base.
Decoration: painted in overglaze enamels and gold. Inscription.

Historical period(s)
Saljuq period, Late 12th-early 13th
Medium
Stone-paste body painted over glaze with enamel (mina'i)
Dimensions
H x Diam: 8.8 x 23 cm (3 7/16 x 9 1/16 in)
Geography
Iran
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1938.12
On View Location
Freer Gallery 03: Engaging the Senses: Art in the Islamic World
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Bowl

Keywords
harp, Iran, Saljuq period (1037 - 1300), WWII-era provenance
Provenance

To 1938
Dikran G. Kelekian (1868-1951), Cairo, Egypt, Paris, France, and New York to 1938 [1]

From 1938
Freer Gallery of Art, purchased from Dikran G. Kelekian, New York in 1938 [2]

Notes:

[1] Undated folder sheet note. See Freer Gallery or Art Purchase List after 1920, Collections Management Office.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

Dikran Garabed Kelekian 1868-1951

Description

Clay: sandy, white.
Glaze: opaque, cream-colored, crazed; lustreless blue glaze on the base.
Decoration: painted in overglaze enamels and gold. Inscription.

Published References
  • Glenn Peers. Orthodox Magic in Trebizond and Beyond: A Fourteenth-century Greco-Arabic Amulet Roll. Seyssel, France. fig. 40.
  • Freer Gallery of Art. Gallery Book III: Exhibition of December 5, 1938. Washington. .
  • Ralph Pinder Wilson. Islamic Art: One Hundred Plates in Colour with an Introductory Essay on Islamic Art. London. pl. 25.
  • Wiebke Walther. Die Frau im Islam [Women in Islam]. Leipzig and Montclair, New Jersey, 1980-1981. pl. 55.
  • Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary, 1938. Washington, 1938-1939. pl. 1.
  • Richard Ettinghausen, Ernst Kuhnel. A Survey of Persian Art from Prehistoric Times to the Present. 6 vols., London and New York, 1938 - 1939. vol. 2: pp. 1600, 1700, 2000, 2664, 2665, 2795, 2796,, vol. 5: pl. 652.
  • Oriental Ceramics: The World's Great Collections. 12 vols., Tokyo. vol. 10, pl. 90.
  • Assadullah Souren Melikian-Chirvani. Materiaux pour Servir a l'Histoire de la Peinture Persane I: Trois Manuscrits de l'Iran Seldjoukide. vol. 16 Paris, 1967. fig. 3.
  • Dikran Garabed Kelekian. Kelekian Collection of Persian and Analogous Potteries, 1885-1910. Paris. pl. 40.
  • Ernst Grube. The Classical Style in Islamic Painting: The Early School of Herat and its Impact on Islamic painting of the later 15th, the 16th and 17th centuries : Some examples in American collections. Venice. .
  • Dr. Esin Atil. Islamic Women as Rulers and Patrons. vol. 5, no. 2 New York, Spring 1993. cover.
  • Atif Toor. Islamic Culture. Discovering the Arts Vero Beach, FL. cover.
  • Dr. Esin Atil. Exhibition of 2500 Years of Persian Art. Exh. cat. Washington, 1971. cat. 69, pp. 19, 21.
  • Richard Ettinghausen. Medieval Near Eastern Ceramics in the Freer Gallery of Art. Washington and Baltimore. p. 25.
  • Stewart Desmond, in association with the editors of Time-Life Books. Early Islam. Great Ages of Man New York. p. 78.
  • Persian Art: In an Ancient Culture, it was Both Poetic and Useful., June 24, 1946. pp. 90-92.
  • Dr. Esin Atil. Ceramics from the World of Islam. Exh. cat. Washington, 1973. cat. 41, pp. 94-95.
  • Volkmar Enderlein. Islamische Kunst. Dresden. p. 134.
  • Richard Ettinghausen. Dated Persian Ceramics in Some American Museums. vol. 4, no. 3, June 1936. p. 145, figs. 1, 2.
  • Antony Eastmond. Tamita's World: The Life and Encounters of a Medieval Noblewoman from the Middle East to Mongolia. Cambridge, United Kingdom. p. 236, fig. 75 and plate 75.
Collection Area(s)
Arts of the Islamic World
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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