Bottle

Bottle: small, irregular, ellipsoidal; spiral corrugated ridges.
Clay: hard, gray. Stoneware, brown on surface.
Glaze: thin reddish wash with olive drops; partly disintegrated.

Historical period(s)
Ming or Qing dynasty, 16th-mid 17th century
Medium
Stoneware with splashes of melted wood ash
Dimensions
H x W: 19.9 x 10.1 cm (7 13/16 x 4 in)
Geography
China, Zhejiang, Anhui, or Jiangsu province
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1917.211
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Bottle

Keywords
China, Ming dynasty (1368 - 1644), Qing dynasty (1644 - 1911), stoneware
Provenance
Provenance research underway.
Description

Bottle: small, irregular, ellipsoidal; spiral corrugated ridges.
Clay: hard, gray. Stoneware, brown on surface.
Glaze: thin reddish wash with olive drops; partly disintegrated.

Label

In Japan unglazed stoneware containers such as this one were known as Namban (southern barbarian) ware. Used for transporting some sort of liquid, bottles of this shape were widely dispersed in East and Southeast Asia, including Vietnam. They were of an appropriate size to serve as hanging vases in the tearoom, suspended from a hook in the display alcove wall or adjacent wooden pillar. They were known as chimaki vases because of their resemblance to a conical sweet made for the Fifth Day, Fifth Month festival.

Published References
  • Louise Allison Cort, George Williams, David P. Rehfuss. Ceramics in Mainland Southeast Asia. Washington. .
  • John Stevenson, John Guy, Louise Allison Cort. Vietnamese Ceramics: A Separate Tradition. Chicago. p. 69, fig. 3.
Collection Area(s)
Chinese Art
Web Resources
Ceramics in Mainland Southeast Asia
Google Cultural Institute
SI Usage Statement

Usage Conditions Apply

There are restrictions for re-using this image. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

The information presented on this website may be revised and updated at any time as ongoing research progresses or as otherwise warranted. Pending any such revisions and updates, information on this site may be incomplete or inaccurate or may contain typographical errors. Neither the Smithsonian nor its regents, officers, employees, or agents make any representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the information on the site. Use this site and the information provided on it subject to your own judgment. The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery welcome information that would augment or clarify the ownership history of objects in their collections.