Bowl

Shallow faience bowl with an intense blue glaze. The flat rim of the bowl is painted black. The bowl is painted on the inside surface with figures outlined in black. In the center is a circle, divided into four sections; two are painted black, the other two left unpainted. Four lotus flowers project from the central motif. The lotus flowers each have three petals and look more like tridents than flowers. The four are separated by four tilapia fish, whose scales are indicated by a cross-hatch pattern and whose fins are rendered by a series of short lines radiating out from the top of each fish. The lotus flowers and the fish are very crudely painted and do not show any of the usual skilled freehand and flowing design typical of this type of faience bowl.

Historical period(s)
Modern, mid 19th-early 20th century
Medium
Glazed composition with paint
Dimensions
H x W: 4.3 x 17.3 cm (1 11/16 x 6 13/16 in)
Geography
Egypt
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number
F1907.14
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Faience, Vessel
Type

Bowl

Keywords
Egypt, fish, forgery, lotus
Provenance

To 1907
Unidentified owner, Egypt, to 1907 [1]

From 1907 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased in Egypt from an unidentified owner in 1907 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Pottery List, L. 1833, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives.

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Previous Owner(s)

Charles Lang Freer 1854 - 1919

Description

Shallow faience bowl with an intense blue glaze. The flat rim of the bowl is painted black. The bowl is painted on the inside surface with figures outlined in black. In the center is a circle, divided into four sections; two are painted black, the other two left unpainted. Four lotus flowers project from the central motif. The lotus flowers each have three petals and look more like tridents than flowers. The four are separated by four tilapia fish, whose scales are indicated by a cross-hatch pattern and whose fins are rendered by a series of short lines radiating out from the top of each fish. The lotus flowers and the fish are very crudely painted and do not show any of the usual skilled freehand and flowing design typical of this type of faience bowl.

Published References
  • Ann C. Gunter. A Collector's Journey: Charles Lang Freer and Egypt. Washington and London, 2002. p. 117, fig. 4.21.
Collection Area(s)
Ancient Egyptian Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum