Tea caddy, imo-no-ko type

Light gray clay; surface concealed by iron wash. Concentrically trimmed base with scars of gravel.
Iron glaze, mottled reddish brown to black, over iron wash; two finger marks in lower edge of glaze. Inside glazed.

Historical period(s)
Momoyama period, 1570-1580
Medium
Stoneware with iron and ash glazes; ivory lid
Style
Mino ware
Dimensions
H x W x D: 7.6 x 7.3 x 7.3 cm (3 x 2 7/8 x 2 7/8 in)
Geography
Japan, Gifu prefecture
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number
F1905.47a-b
On View Location
Freer Gallery 06: Imperfectly Beautiful: Inventing Japanese Ceramic Style
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Tea caddy (imo-no-ko chaire)

Keywords
Japan, Momoyama period (1573 - 1615), Seto ware, stoneware, tea
Provenance

To 1905
Thomas E. Waggaman (1839-1906), Washington, DC, to 1905 [1]

From 1905 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased at the sale of the Waggaman Collection, American Art Association, New York, NY, January 25-February 3, 1905, no. 1904 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Pottery List, L. 1360, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Also see Curatorial Remark 11, Louise Cort, June 17, 2008, in the object record.

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Previous Owner(s)

Thomas E. Waggaman 1839 - 1906
Charles Lang Freer 1854-1919
American Art Association (C.L. Freer source) established 1883

Description

Light gray clay; surface concealed by iron wash. Concentrically trimmed base with scars of gravel.
Iron glaze, mottled reddish brown to black, over iron wash; two finger marks in lower edge of glaze. Inside glazed.

Label

A thin coat of iron wash on this jar enriches the color of the iron glaze and conceals the light gray clay body, creating a uniform dark tone. Such attention to details marks the transformation of the Seto tea caddy from a utilitarian container to a sculptural object.

Published References
  • Louise Allison Cort. Seto and Mino Ceramics. Washington and Honolulu, 1992. cat. 55, p. 130.
Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum