Serving dish

Dish, flaring, shallow, circular; heavily notched foot.
Clay: dense, gray.
Glaze: rich, greenish-gray over red-brown wash.
Decoration: in brown, green, and thick white glaze, under glaze. Pine boughs in brown with spattered-slip “snow” (copies Kenzan idea).

Maker(s)
Artist: Kiyomizu Rokubei II (1777-1847)
Historical period(s)
Edo period, early 19th century
Medium
Stoneware with white slip and iron pigment under feldspathic glaze
Dimensions
H x Diam: 6.3 x 27.7 cm (2 1/2 x 10 7/8 in)
Geography
Japan, Kyoto prefecture, Kyoto, Gojozaka
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art
Accession Number
F1896.52
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Dish

Keywords
Edo period (1615 - 1868), Japan, pine tree, snow, stoneware, winter
Provenance

To 1896
Rufus E. Moore, New York to 1896 [1]

From 1896 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased from Rufus E. Moore in 1896 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Pottery List, L. 202, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives.

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Previous Owner(s)

Rufus E. Moore (C.L. Freer source) 1840-1918
Charles Lang Freer 1854-1919

Description

Dish, flaring, shallow, circular; heavily notched foot.
Clay: dense, gray.
Glaze: rich, greenish-gray over red-brown wash.
Decoration: in brown, green, and thick white glaze, under glaze. Pine boughs in brown with spattered-slip "snow" (copies Kenzan idea).

Marking(s)

Character kiyo [Jpn] inside double hexagon.

Label

The Kiyomizu Rokubei workshop took its name from its location in the Kiyomizu district of eastern Kyoto long known for pottery production.  This large plate borrows its decor from a bowl by the early 18th-century potter Ogata Kenzan.  Pine boughs are rendered in broad strokes of underglaze iron, while white slip spattered over the surface becomes drifting snow.  Purposefully rustic in form, the plate conveys a warmth and sturdiness that offset its wintry imagery.

Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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