string(20) "edanmdm:fsg_S1992.26" Dasi Ghar Milan - National Museum of Asian Art

Dasi Ghar Milan

Detail of a pattern
Image 1 of 1
IIIF

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At A Glance

  • Period

    late 19th century
  • Geography

    Nathadwara, Rajasthan state, Mewar, India
  • Material

    Opaque watercolor on cotton
  • Dimension

    H x W: 248.5 x 150 cm (97 13/16 x 59 1/16 in)
  • Accession Number

    S1992.26
  • EDAN ID

    edanmdm:fsg_S1992.26

Object Details

  • Court

    Mewar Court
  • School/Tradition

    Rajput school
  • Provenance

    Between 1969 and 1973-1992
    Karl B. Mann, method of acquisition unknown in India [1]
    From 1992
    Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, gift of Karl B. Mann [2]
    Notes:
    [1] Karl B. Mann began collecting temple hangings during his first trip to India in 1969 to acquire objects as part of his work as an interior designer and supplier to other dealers in New York, NY. By 1973, Mann had returned to India nine times to expand his collection. See untitled memo from Carol Bolon, dated June 26, 1992, copy in object file. See also Lillian Jackson Braun, “A Little Bit of India for Your Walls” [newspaper article], (Detroit: Detroit Free Press, January 15, 1973), p. 2C, copy in object file. See also Genevieve Fernandez, “Prestigious Art: Designers Lead the Way” [newspaper article], (Atlanta: The Atlanta Constitution, June 2, 1974), p. G7, copy in object file. See also Barbara Bradford, “Eclectic Look Shows Off Art’s Beauty” [newspaper article], (Chicago: Chicago Tribune, November 30, 1974), p. 1B-4, copy in object file.
    Mann loaned this object to the American Federation of Arts for the traveling exhibition, “Rajasthani Temple Hangings of the Krishna Cult from the Collection of Karl Mann, New York.” The exhibition ran from January 14, 1973 to March 9, 1975. See Robert Skelton, “Rajasthani Temple Hangings of the Krishna Cult from the Collection of Karl Mann, New York” [exhibition catalogue], (New York: American Federation of Arts, 1973).
    Karl B. Mann is a Chicago-born artist and former interior designer who resides in New York, NY since 1948. Through his work, Mann investigates the subtle art of collage and assemblage for over fifty years. In 1958, Mann founded the international interior design company Karl Mann Associates, which had locations in New York City and fourteen other cities across the United States. The company supplied buyers with an eclectic mix of modern furniture, art, and antiques. Mann sold the company in 1984 to pursue his art.
    [2] See memo titled “New Objects in Gallery,” from Kelly Welch to Milo Beach, dated June 11, 1992, copy in object file. The object was transferred from Karl B. Mann to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery for acquisition consideration on June 11, 1992.
    See also Arthur M. Sackler, “Acquisition Consideration Form,” approved on June 26, 1992, copy in object file.
    See also “Deed of Gift to the Arthur M. Sacker Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution,” dated July 15, 1992, copy in object file.
    Research updated July 17, 2023
  • Collection

    National Museum of Asian Art Collection
  • Exhibition History

    Rajasthani Temple Hangings of the Krishna Cult from the Collection of Karl Mann, New York (January 14, 1973 to March 9, 1975)
  • Previous custodian or owner

    Karl B. Mann
  • Origin

    Nathadwara, Rajasthan state, Mewar, India
  • Credit Line

    Gift of Karl B. Mann
  • Type

    Painting
  • Restrictions and Rights

    Usage Conditions Apply

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